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How can you tell if a franchise has peaked?


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Here's an interesting article discussing what can influence the staying power of a video game franchise in both public awareness, popularity and ultimately sales. Does the developer make a difference? Does the frequency of iterations of the game getting churned out make a difference? Etc.

http://www.industrygamers.com/news/halo-franchise-has-peaked-says-analyst/

Interestingly, these are financial analysts making the comments, not videogame journalists. Here's an example:

We just got this last-minute response from Michael Pachter of Wedbush Morgan Securities as well:

"It's really hard to predict because of the change in developer. I think that if Bungie kept making Halo games, there would be demand for a long time. I'm in the 'every two year' camp for most franchises, they seem to perform best on that time line. Games that come out more frequently (sports, Tony Hawk) seem to fade pretty fast, and games that come out less frequently tend to thrive, but run the risk of becoming stale. We'll see what happens with Max Payne, for example (at least 6 years since the last one). If Microsoft can bring out a Halo game every two years, they can probably sell enough to justify the development expense without destroying the brand."

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It will definitely be interesting to see what they do with Halo. My guess is that it probably has peaked and quality will quickly go downhill after Reach. That is unless MS can get some writers and designers who can really capture the feel that they've created for that universe.

I'm speaking only of the campaign - the multiplayer already makes me ill.

On a related note, Reach was actually my favorite of the single player campaigns. It was a little on the short side, but I thought the design of the whole thing was fantastic. There was a lot more room to maneuver around during firefights, and you could actually pull off flanking moves or get surrounded if you weren't paying attention, especially on higher difficulty levels. Previous games seemed a lot more fixed to me in terms of the actual firefights - you were at one end and they were at the other. This time they gave you more cover to work with and a lot of different ways in which you could approach a fight.

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On a related note, Reach was actually my favorite of the single player campaigns. It was a little on the short side, but I thought the design of the whole thing was fantastic.

Thanks for your impressions on the game. I haven't picked up Reach yet but likely eventually will. (All my spare gaming time these days is going towards Starcraft 2 :thumbsup: )

There was a lot more room to maneuver around during firefights, and you could actually pull off flanking moves or get surrounded if you weren't paying attention, especially on higher difficulty levels. Previous games seemed a lot more fixed to me in terms of the actual firefights - you were at one end and they were at the other. This time they gave you more cover to work with and a lot of different ways in which you could approach a fight.

Christian "Serellan" Allen (many here remember he previously worked on the GR franchise at Red Storm) was a Lead Designer on Reach so I wonder how much of the more open gameplay in single player was from his input into the game ...

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Christian "Serellan" Allen (many here remember he previously worked on the GR franchise at Red Storm) was a Lead Designer on Reach so I wonder how much of the more open gameplay in single player was from his input into the game ...

Hehe yeah good question.. I mean it's certainly not as open as Summit Strike, but if it was then it wouldn't really be Halo. But you definitely get more of a feel that you're working as part of a unit this time around.

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  • 1 month later...

On a related note, Reach was actually my favorite of the single player campaigns. It was a little on the short side, but I thought the design of the whole thing was fantastic.

Thanks for your impressions on the game. I haven't picked up Reach yet but likely eventually will. (All my spare gaming time these days is going towards Starcraft 2 :thumbsup: )

There was a lot more room to maneuver around during firefights, and you could actually pull off flanking moves or get surrounded if you weren't paying attention, especially on higher difficulty levels. Previous games seemed a lot more fixed to me in terms of the actual firefights - you were at one end and they were at the other. This time they gave you more cover to work with and a lot of different ways in which you could approach a fight.

Christian "Serellan" Allen (many here remember he previously worked on the GR franchise at Red Storm) was a Lead Designer on Reach so I wonder how much of the more open gameplay in single player was from his input into the game ...

I'd say quite a bit. Steve Cotton worked on it as well.

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