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Ubi PC Titles To Require Online Authentication


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I know this won't be a popular opinion but I see this as a good thing for PC gamers. Why? Because it shows investment in the PC platform. In recent years UBI has shown only minimum interest in the PC platform. Just enough to port the games from the console version and make it playable on the PC. Vegas 1 and Vegas 2 are great examples of this. Both of them could have been great PC titles (though not necessarily R6 titles) but they did the minimum amount of work to get it to the PC platform and left it unfinished from a PC perspective. I had a lot of fun playing the MP parts of those games, but ultimately there were just too buggy and lacked some essential PCesque features.

If this type of DRM makes UBI think the PC platform is more viable (i.e. bigger profits) and they are willing to invest in the infrastructure for uPlay, that kind of tells me they are/will be willing to invest more in making games that utilize the strengths of the PC platform. Sure they will still be console ports but maybe at least they may spend more time in modifying and adding features that fit the PC platform. Of course I could just be overly optimistic. ;)

In the end though all we can do is wait and see. AC2 isn't my type of game but GR4 is of definite interest to me. But after seeing some of the speculation of the "advanced soldier" type stuff on the front page, it kind of turns me away from it.

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Those in the SHV forums are not happy, especially since it is an SP only game. I think that is the biggest sticking point people are having. Uplay also ties in with console games. It was brought up that this may be a way for Ubi to tie in PC and console games together like GFWL and crossplatform gaming Shadowrun (where console gamers got auto aim assist so they could keep up with the PC gamers). Toss in Ubi's unreliable servers and people see a recipe for disaster and lost game saves.

If there was something that definitely stopped piracy and didn't hamstring those who bought the game, I do not think you would see much negative feedback on it.

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Pessimist: The state of PC gaming (w/inclusion of OSP) could hardly get worse.

Optimist: Oh, yes it could.

____

Realist: Ubisoft is cuckoo for cocoa puffs.

:rofl:

Someone on the Ubi Conviction forums brought up something. Ubi may trying to make this like a GFWL type deal for Ubi games and a way to introduce cross platform gaming to them. The thing is, that might be fine for games with an MP component, but what about a game like SHV? It is SP only and with no need to be connected to the internet 24/7.

I really do not want games to be cross platform enabled. Shadowrun has shown that someone will get one of 2 things, either a feature that allows them to compete against PC gamers better or worse, PC games will be dumbed down. Ubi already has a game services ironically called Ubi.com Game Services and it was even included with Ubi games as far back as GR. Why would they need to invent something new? As it is, they disabled the chat for that long time ago as I D ten T's would use IRC to ghost moderators and do nothing but spam the forums.

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crossplatform gaming Shadowrun (where console gamers got auto aim assist so they could keep up with the PC gamers)

Wow, never heard that before. I'll bet that community was a fun place to visit for a while!

This will end up being the PC gamers being restricted to the console abilities.

:unsure:

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It was announced yesterday, that the developers of Rise of Flight will be patching the need for always needing to be connected to the internet to play the game, at least for a couple of SP game modes. They stated that they can accept some piracy if it means more customers will buy said game. The vocal opponents made their concerns known and the developers listened. I have doubts that Ubi will.

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It was announced yesterday, that the developers of Rise of Flight will be patching the need for always needing to be connected to the internet to play the game, at least for a couple of SP game modes.

That's pretty cool. From RoF site

We've been tracking all of our users' wishes and desires. You helped us out immensely by answering questions in our dispatches, voting in forum polls and generally expressing your opinions. We've also been checking out network stats and market trends. As a result, we came to the conclusion that you all needed the ability to fly without a permanent internet connection (in some game modes). A network connection will still be necessary for new user account and profile creation. And, of course, multiplayer and a few other game modes still rely on internet access. But now, if your provider is down, you have insufficient funds, or you just plain hate to log into games all the time, you will be able to fly internet-free in single player mode or in the new 'Quick Mission' mode. We hope that this modification will ease your minds about personal intrusion and internet provider costs. After all, we developed Rise Of Flight to help you escape those every-day, mundane worries and just let you fly carefree!

We are completely aware that this change will simplify further creation of illegal copies, thus jeopardizing our potential income. But the creation of highly-realistic aviation simulators in our commercial world is impossible without an optimistic point of view. And right now, we are feeling pretty optimistic. I'm sure that the number of legit pilots, happy with this decision, will outnumber the illegal copies. So spread the word to all of your friends that balked at the login requirement and didn't purchase RoF. Now, there is no excuse not to give it a try!

How cool would it be for Ubisoft to release something like...

We've been tracking all of our users' wishes and desires. You've helped us out immensely with feedback and suggestions in community forums and generally expressing your opinions. We've also been checking out feedback on our plans to introduce always on connection requirements. As a result, we came to the conclusion that a permanent internet connection requirement could potentially and occasionally prevent legitimate customers from playing our games, we have therefore decided not to proceed with connection required protection.
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Will I need to be online the whole time when I play the game? Including for single player?

Yes. You will.

Not too happy about that to be honest, but if that's the order of the day to play then take it or leave it i suppose. Looking forward to splinter cell conviction (pc version), i hope their servers are regularly maintained lol.

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Will I need to be online the whole time when I play the game? Including for single player?

Yes. You will.

Not too happy about that to be honest, but if that's the order of the day to play then take it or leave it i suppose. Looking forward to splinter cell conviction (pc version), i hope their servers are regularly maintained lol.

That is the thing, they aren't. Apparently there was a problem with them this weekend of some sort even. Sigs for forum members stopped showing up for about 24 hours or so.

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Will I need to be online the whole time when I play the game? Including for single player?

Yes. You will.

Not too happy about that to be honest, but if that's the order of the day to play then take it or leave it i suppose. Looking forward to splinter cell conviction (pc version), i hope their servers are regularly maintained lol.

That is the thing, they aren't. Apparently there was a problem with them this weekend of some sort even. Sigs for forum members stopped showing up for about 24 hours or so.

This will be the very reason for people uninstalling said game because of frustration, if, and when, it happens.

Have we had a topic about what else they could do to reduce piracy? Or do we all just keep ranting because we don`t like what they are doing to reduce piracy?

:hmm:

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...take it or leave it...
Leave it, and then let Ubi stew over their network stats, market trends, and poll results and try to put two and two together.

____

How something like this (OSP) ever gets put on someones desk for approval -when the negatives so vastly out number the positives- is puzzling to say the least and leaves you to wonder just how they spend their free time.

____

Great news for RoF owners. :thumbsup:

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Have we had a topic about what else they could do to reduce piracy? Or do we all just keep ranting because we don`t like what they are doing to reduce piracy?

:hmm:

I've been wondering if there is anything as well. It would be good for all pc gamers (minus the thieves) if there was an answer. It has to be a big part of why the investment in pc game development is waning.

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Have we had a topic about what else they could do to reduce piracy? Or do we all just keep ranting because we don`t like what they are doing to reduce piracy?

:hmm:

I've been wondering if there is anything as well. It would be good for all pc gamers (minus the thieves) if there was an answer. It has to be a big part of why the investment in pc game development is waning.

Just take a look at what Stardock is doing if you really want to know.

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Reading through all five pages :lol: I personally share a lot of the same sentiment. That Gamer's Bill of Rights touches on a lot of what I've been complaining about for some time. However, I can see the need for some type of DRM facet in one form or another. So I have been thinking about it and perhaps have come up with some solutions that gamers and publishers a like could agree on. :lol: I don't know, I'm just a thinker. :D

=The following may require an aspirin=

What should happen from the start is that DRM needs to be embedded into the work in such a way so that any manipulation of the code would render that product useless. A routine check of some sort within the game's line of code. But it has to be broad based because a hacker can bypass simple routines with a wrapper of some sort or other process.

Borrowing from the online validation approach written about here, perhaps a one time authentication per install is all that is needed in conjunction with an account mentioned. This account would allow maybe five to ten unique installs per PC. You can install the game as many times as you want on the same PCs that are registered. What you couldn't do however, is install the game on an eleventh PC for that matter a PC that isn't registered as one of the five to ten allotted. That's not to say each account would nullify this rule sense all data would be shard within the validation server. The account is there for the consumer's info. What would happen is that when you make an install the game calls home and asks for your user account. Built into the game's code would run a hash check of your PC's motherboard and CPU, much like what Windows does for their protection mechanisms and what Punk Buster's hardware banning does. This info is what idents one PC from the other. A unique key is formulated based on the game's contents and of the PC, run with a company specific algorithm of some sort that will produce a unique CD key that is passed along to the server. No user CD key entry needed.

What I'm trying to address are at least three problems; authentication (are you a legit copy?), anti-code manipulation (to prevent hacking of code), and consumer rights to play the game (is this your eleventh install and is it on a different PC?) at the same time mitigate the cumbersomeness to gamers. The only nuisance to a gamer that he or she would see is that when you install you MUST have an Internet connection. Subsequent runs of the game after install need not an Internet connection.

The reason behind all these mechanisms is that without them your open to a hack/backdoor of some sort. For instance one could argue that the algorithm could be hacked, but sense the code is in it's self hash checked with a company specific algorithm it makes it quit difficult. You mess with the code you mess with the authentication. :lol: Basically one checks the other. :D

To conclude my nerdy thought provoking gibberish... :lol: Combating piracy is no small task. In one hand you have the consumer and in the other the pirate. Both have to be balanced in such a way. It is my belief that embedded DRM and the anti-piracy mechanisms need to be self checking to prevent piracy and at the same time not cumbersome to the consumer.

Okay, did you get all that? :lol: :lol:

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MS banned 1 million Xbox`s from Xbox-live not so long back. :yes:

All good, this is were the catch is. How could you justify banning just 1 single PC from the Internet? Pretty sure it is a big difference, modding an Xbox machine to allow whatever, when it is designed to do not that thing, to doing what you can on the PC, which is a home PC, that has access to all the family, and is capable of so much, all on it`s own.

I`m all for having to be online to authorise and register, etc... Just a bad deal to not have an ability to play it off line.

But IF it promotes a better class of games, then so be it?

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...then so be it?
Not in this household.

If I want to spend 4 hours in the editor finishing up a mission for SP play, just how is the old ball and chain supposed to complain to her mom about it...on the same landline. 0:)

____

Better cyphers.

A constant online connection requirement will drive off far more legitimate users than deter typical pirates.

Simple economics, OSP will be a Lose-Lose for Ubi.

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That's one of the reason I never got Rise of Flight because I don't like the idea that I have to be online to play a game, people say that online activation, digital distribution and online DRM is the way of the future, if by some reason all the publishers go that way I'm going to find me another hobby for sure like restoring an old car or something.

I'm going to bet this kind of practices are going to hit the console market too maybe in 2 generations ahead we are going to see a DLC console only that way they can cut netflix/blockbuster, retailers and the used market in one blow.

OT: Microsoft pulled the plug with the free/pay DLC on first generation XBOX I know is last generation and is old but PEOPLE PAYED for that content and they don't have access to that content right now, at least is not that bad in the last generation but I know alot of pleople in this generation with over $200 in DLC alone, now if MS with all the money and resources in the world can do something like that what can we expect from UBIsoft with their track record?

Edited by Sgt. Atoa
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Reviewers of recent Ubi PC games have had a chance to experience the new DRM in action:

The game stopped, and I was dumped back to a menu screen - all my progress since it last autosaved was lost.

Even massively multiplayer games aren't so draconian about the internet: you can't play when the server's down, but at least you don't lose anything for getting disconnected.

Source: PC Gamer blog

:popcorn:

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