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Violent games, vexing issues


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GRAW2 for 360 was specifically mentioned in this new articles as a way to show that not all shooters should be considered violent.

Violent games, vexing issues

COMPLAINTS ABOUT `SHOOTERS' OVERLOOK DIVERSITY OF TITLES

BY MIKE ANTONUCCI

MERCURY NEWS

Article Launched: 05/12/2007 01:32:54 AM PDT

Back in the news: violence in video games.

The issue never goes away completely, and sometimes the hubbub about games even fades into the background compared to a dust-up about some other kind of entertainment. But for a variety of reasons, including a recent Federal Trade Commission report and renewed scrutiny about school shootings, games are under a microscope again, as well as a bull's-eye from certain critics.

That makes it a good time, especially in the context of the bestselling games so far this year, to point out that games have individuality. The better ones are even artistically unique, including some with big quotients of what some would call "action" and others would label "violence."

Bottom line: Not all the hot-button games referred to as "shooters" are interchangeable in the debate. Video games in general have become incredibly diverse in terms of being casual or all-absorbing, relatively simple or technologically complex. Shooters are just as divergent.

Consider, for example, "Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter 2," a Teen-rated, Xbox 360 game from Ubisoft that was one of the top 10 sellers for the first quarter of the year.

Known as GRAW 2, this game is a "tactical shooter," emphasizing coordination among military squad mates, as well as assault planning that depends on using cover while being guided by the heads-up display (HUD) that puts navigational and weapons information on screen.

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Nice find Z.

...and I agree. In fact, most shooters aren't bad for kids (other than language used), it's primarily a few action/adventure style games that are *also* shooters that are not so good for kids. The majority of games are just fine. However, it's all up to us parents--gotta do the homework (and research ;)) to know what's appropriate for your kids. My son is 7. There are a couple of M rated games that I'll actually let him play or watch me play, but then there are also some T games that I won't let him near. It's all about judgment. Parents that aren't willing to do the research on each game shouldn't be buying games for their kids.

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How many boy racers will go out after a game of Forza and put their foot down? and thats not a violent game.

not by playing games ,but i have to admit after going on the bumping cars at the fairground i Wanted to bump my motor vehicle into others but nonetheless never did

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The author of the article talks more in his blog about what he wrote.

Bottom line: Not all the hot-button games referred to as “shooters'’ are interchangeable in the debate. Video games in general have become incredibly diverse in terms of being casual or all-absorbing, relatively simple or technologically complex. Shooters are just as divergent.

Consider, for example, “Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter 2,'’ a Teen-rated, Xbox 360 game from Ubisoft that was one of the top 10 sellers for the first quarter of the year.

Known as GRAW 2, this game is a “tactical shooter,'’ emphasizing coordination among military squad mates, as well as assault planning that depends on using cover while being guided by the heads-up display (HUD) that puts navigational and weapons information on

screen.

It’s easy to define this game — and its sale appeal — by elements of violence that go beyond the warfare theme. It has many of the ingredients that are flash points for game critics, including a practice mode for taking head shots.

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For any of us to say that this is not a violent game is a losing cause. We will lose that fight every time. GRAW2 is NOT, however, a game that promotes gratuitous violence. Compared to games like Grand Theft Auto, Ghost Recon looks as violent as Super Mario Brothers (with guns). All I'm saying is that we need to be smart with our arguements against the Joe Lieberman/Tipper Gores of the world....

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I agree, one person shooting another is violent, surely; the difference is how it's portrayed. That context is what determines HOW violent it is. There's violence in tv commercials, and plenty of it shown on the news too. Gamers understand this difference, but a lot of closed minded people don't understand the difference if they don't play the games to know.

The guy in the article is right, you can't simply condemn "violence" it's everywhere. That's why parents have to do their homework to see if the level of violence is acceptable in their households. Just like some kids will be ok with some horror oriented games, others could be really affected by that. Depends on the child, and that means it's got to be up to the parent. ESRB etc just needs to flag games for the parents to know *something* about it.

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