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Crossing the critical graphics threshold . . .


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Like a number of posters, I'd been a bit disappointed by the graphics, or rather by what appeared to be the fairly high system specs required to achieve decent-looking visuals with playable framerates. My system is by no means top-shelf, but it's a perfectly decent machine, and I keep it well-maintained:

P4E 3.0GHz

1GB DDR 400 RAM (dual-channel)

X800XT AIW 256MB AGP

74GB Raptor

X-Fi XtremeMusic

XP Pro

I was managing low-20s framerates at either 1024x768 with low textures or 800x600 at medium textures (it became a hard decision: lower framerates or less jaggies, which equaled a greater view distance). I was enjoying GRAW, but it looked plain mushy and my enjoyment was often tempered by the frustration of low framerates.

Turns out I kept my computer too well-maintained. While troubleshooting another problem, I opened up my case and noticed that during my seasonal cleaning session a couple months ago, I had accidently replugged my videocard power in from a cable already powering my hard drives. I immediately placed the videocard on a separate cable, by itself, and now I'm happily getting smooth framerates at 1024x768 with textures on medium, which makes a world of difference, in terms of visuals.

I can now appreciate the look of GRAW much more and can truthfully compliment GRIN on a nice-looking game.

I'd also suggest anyone check their power connection to their videocard if they're getting mysterious subpar performance in GRAW or any other game; I only discovered this because of massive slowdowns in SWAT4, which I knew my machine could handle without any problems.

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Just as a note... All high end Video cards require the power cable plugged in when AGP. Pci express doesn't use this. Also a stable power supply with seperate rails (put your video card on a connector of it's own) like a neo from antec makes a WORLD of difference.

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Fantastic news man. I glad you we're able to find that.

I do know, as you do as well, a lot of people who have rigs at or above "recomended" specs and are having low framerates.

I really hope there is a possible fix for that issues.

I personally am loving this game and am doing the neccesary upgrades to get the eyecandy.

Laters!

Fresh

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Just as a note... All high end Video cards require the power cable plugged in when AGP. Pci express doesn't use this. Also a stable power supply with seperate rails (put your video card on a connector of it's own) like a neo from antec makes a WORLD of difference.

jUST A NOTE.

i USE bfg NvIDIA 7900 gtx-oc ON pcI-exPRESS...AND THEY HAVE A BIG 4 PIN POWER CONNECTOR AT THEIR REAR TOO.

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Just as a note... All high end Video cards require the power cable plugged in when AGP. Pci express doesn't use this. Also a stable power supply with seperate rails (put your video card on a connector of it's own) like a neo from antec makes a WORLD of difference.

jUST A NOTE.

i USE bfg NvIDIA 7900 gtx-oc ON pcI-exPRESS...AND THEY HAVE A BIG 4 PIN POWER CONNECTOR AT THEIR READ TOO.

You mean in addition to a PCI-e connector?

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Just as a note... All high end Video cards require the power cable plugged in when AGP. Pci express doesn't use this. Also a stable power supply with seperate rails (put your video card on a connector of it's own) like a neo from antec makes a WORLD of difference.

jUST A NOTE.

i USE bfg NvIDIA 7900 gtx-oc ON pcI-exPRESS...AND THEY HAVE A BIG 4 PIN POWER CONNECTOR AT THEIR READ TOO.

You mean in addition to a PCI-e connector?

i MEAN LOOKING AT THESE PHOTO'S I TOOK

IMG_5967b.jpg

IMG_5960b.jpg

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That is PCI-e cables to both of your cards, I don't see any other cable going to these cards. Then you got a PPU-card in between (strange architecture from the position I am standing).

Nice cooling btw.

Plz don't misunderstand me, but I thought the 4-pin connector at the rear of these 7900 were the 12v rail @ 30 Amps max = 350Watts of power each of these cards need to run at peak.

So I've always called them power connectors.

The Pci-e connector is the one that replaced the older AGP [slot] connector on the card edge ?

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Well they are power connectors, so call them that if you like (on your first pic you can actually see the text "PCI-e" on the connector. I don't know the exact benefit of the discussed standard of connector. Anyway, there seems to be just one powersupplier going into the card, good to know.

Anyway, I will open my can in some hours to install a new HD AND check how I have connected stuff. Thanks for the reminder DisgruntledArchitect.

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Just as a note... All high end Video cards require the power cable plugged in when AGP. Pci express doesn't use this. Also a stable power supply with seperate rails (put your video card on a connector of it's own) like a neo from antec makes a WORLD of difference.

Roco, My HIS ATI RADEON X1800GTO uses a power cable to juice my card. Came with the card. PCI-E doesn't have the juice to power upper deck cards..

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That is PCI-e cables to both of your cards, I don't see any other cable going to these cards. Then you got a PPU-card in between (strange architecture from the position I am standing).

Nice cooling btw.

Plz don't misunderstand me, but I thought the 4-pin connector at the rear of these 7900 were the 12v rail @ 30 Amps max = 350Watts of power each of these cards need to run at peak.

So I've always called them power connectors.

The Pci-e connector is the one that replaced the older AGP [slot] connector on the card edge ?

*COUGH* Six Pin connector, but I know what you mean viiiper. Those are PCIe power connectors you are referring to. BTW, this Xfire plays this game like no other. I'm running 16x anisotropic all settings on high at 1600x1200 (standard CRT) and it's outperforming my former 7900gtx setup. Not to rub it in viiiper...muhahahahaha! LOL

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All this talk of pci-e power connectors is getting a bit confusing, AGP and PCI-e are how the graphics card slots into the motherboard, the extra power supply into the graphics card is just a 4 pin molex power connector, to get the best out of your card it needs to be on a separate 12v rail from the power supply, so no plugging any cdroms or hard drives onto connectors from that rail. Does that clarify things any?

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All this talk of pci-e power connectors is getting a bit confusing, AGP and PCI-e are how the graphics card slots into the motherboard, the extra power supply into the graphics card is just a 4 pin molex power connector, to get the best out of your card it needs to be on a separate 12v rail from the power supply, so no plugging any cdroms or hard drives onto connectors from that rail. Does that clarify things any?

Not true, PCIe graphic cards require a 6 pin connector and most of the newer (good) PSU's have 2 6 pin PCIe connectors each on a 12 volt rail made specifically for this purpose.

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hmm its been a while since I stuck my bits together, i'd have to check on that but i'm sure its a 4 pin on the graphics card I've got.

just checked on the BFG website and the bundle I got includes this

Dual 4-pin to single 6-pin power cable
so you're more than likely right, there is a 4 pin molex plug on the motherboard I've got for if you use the sli feature, I must have been confused, thats my excuse and i'm sticking to it ;) Edited by CrowmanUK
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Not true, PCIe graphic cards require a 6 pin connector and most of the newer (good) PSU's have 2 6 pin PCIe connectors each on a 12 volt rail made specifically for this purpose.

GHOST_Sup to the rescue again...time for me to crack the case and see wazzup! :thumbsup:

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Not true, PCIe graphic cards require a 6 pin connector and most of the newer (good) PSU's have 2 6 pin PCIe connectors each on a 12 volt rail made specifically for this purpose.

GHOST_Sup to the rescue again...time for me to crack the case and see wazzup! :thumbsup:

Like Crowman mentioned, it is perfectly fine to use the molex converter (2 4 pin molex's that convert into a single 6 pin) that comes with your Graphics card. My earlier x800 pro which was an AGP just had 1 4 pin molex.

The concern that comes into play is if your PSU does not come with a PCIe dedicated 6 pin(s), then how much power is being consumed on the same rail from other periphials such as fans (I like fans!), Disk drives, Optical Drives ect... You would probably be fine if you were only using one vid card, but if you're jumping into the SLI/Xfire realm, then you better have the juice to make it go.

I highly recommend the Fortron FX700 (viiiper has the same one). It's one of the few PSU's that don't over exaggerate or bloat specs...actually they tend to underrate their own product (as far as voltage). It's the best bang for the buck. It's one of the recommended PSU's on SLIzone.com. PSU's are easily the most underlooked part of a rig, yet when it all comes down to it, it's probably the most important!

Edited by GHOST_Sup
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