Jump to content

OverNight Arrrests in Australia- Terrror Suspects


Gordo_Viper
 Share

Recommended Posts

Terror Arrests in Australia

Police have shot and wounded a terrorist suspect amid raids in two states which authorities say have foiled a major terrorist attack in Australia.

The man shot by police in the Sydney suburb of Green Valley was one of 16 people arrested in raids which the NSW and Victorian governments say may have prevented a "catastrophic" terrorist act.

Nine people were arrested in Melbourne and seven in Sydney, police said.

Fearing an imminent terrorist threat, hundreds of ASIO, Australian Federal Police and state police officers swooped simultaneously on homes in the two cities from 2.30am (AEDT), and raids continued late on Tuesday morning.

About 9am (AEDT) police in western Sydney shot and wounded a man in his 20s, while a police officer received minor injuries in the incident.

The man was taken to hospital with wounds to his upper body but his condition was not immediately available.

"I'm satisfied that we have disrupted what I would regard as the final stages of a large scale terrorist attack ... here in Australia," said NSW Police Commissioner Ken Moroney.

"Thankfully the police forces of this country might just have prevented a catastrophic act of terrorism in this country," added NSW Police Minister Carl Scully.

The raids were the culmination of a 16-month surveillance operation and the suspects in Melbourne and Sydney were alleged to be working together, police said.

Authorities were investigating possible links between those arrested and networks overseas.

Victorian Premier Steve Bracks said he believed police had disrupted "probably the most serious preparation for a terrorist attack that we have seen in Australia".

NSW Premier Morris Iemma said it was alleged the group in Sydney was stockpiling chemicals capable of making explosives and that they were believed to be planning a terrorist attack in Australia.

Substances believed to be chemicals were seized in Sydney, police said, while computers seized in Melbourne would also be examined.

Those arrested were appearing in court in Melbourne and Sydney, on federal and state charges.

Late Tuesday morning, a Melbourne court was told nine men arrested in Melbourne had formed a group aimed at carrying out a jihad, or holy war, to kill "innocent men and women in Australia".

Australian Federal Police said the 16 had been, or would be, charged with a range of offences including acts in preparation of a terrorist act, being a member of a terrorist group, and conspiracy to commit a terrorist act.

One man also had been charged with directing a terrorist organisation, he said.

Police said they had not identified any specific targets.

However, Mr Moroney said: "The target could possibly have been in Australia but you would reasonably assume, and I don't have evidence of this, that Sydney or Melbourne were specific targets, but certainly a number of targets in Australia could have been the subject of their attention."

Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Christine Nixon said there was no specific target in Melbourne, and ruled out a link to any threats against next year's Commonwealth Games.

But she said the raids were directly related to Prime Minister John Howard's announcement last week of a possible terrorist threat believed to involve potential Australian targets.

"That was one of the significant points about the amendment, as the previous legislation required us to have a particular location," she said.

"It's the largest operation of counter-terrorism that's ever been conducted in this country and it's taken us a long period of time.

"We are certainly of the belief that there was the potential for great harm to be done to the community and it was related from a terrorist base, so we think that we have thwarted that," Mrs Nixon said.

Mr Bracks said the raids would not have been possible without the new federal laws.

However, senior police said while last week's federal amendments to anti-terror legislation had been a help, the raids would have taken place anyway.

Police arrested seven people in NSW after executing warrants in Lakemba, Belmore, Wiley Park, Greenacre, Illawong, Punchbowl, Hoxton Park, Condell Park, Ingleburn, Belfield, Bankstown and Kemps Creek.

At least five of those arrested in Sydney were Australian citizens.

The nine from Victoria were arrested during raids in Dallas, Hoppers Crossing, Fawkner, Preston, Coburg, Yarraville, Meadow Heights and Hadfield.

Alleging a link between the Sydney and Melbourne arrests, Mr Moroney said: "We will certainly be presenting matters before the court today which we will seek to establish links between both groups."

One of the nine arrested in Melbourne was the outspoken Melbourne Muslim cleric Abu Bakr (Bakr), also known as Abdul Nacer Benbrika, said his lawyer Rob Stary.

Abu Bakr was among the radical Islamic clerics excluded by Prime Minister John Howard from a recent summit on religious violence.

Mr Stary said the nine men, including Bakr, had been charged with being members of a proscribed organisation under anti-terrorism legislation.

The group had not been specified by authorities, he said.

"They are not charged with being involved in the planning or preparation (of a terrorist act) ... they are charged with a membership offence only," he said.

"They are the only charges.

Nor had any materials been seized in Melbourne that indicated the nine were about to launch a terrorist strike, Mr Stary said.

Mr Stary said some of those arrested in Melbourne had been targeted by ASIO raids in June.

Mr Moroney drew comparisons with anti-terror operations in London and Madrid, which he said took place after attacks took place.

Police in Australia had taken pre-emptive action, he said.

"We were not prepared to wait for an event to happen." Mr Moroney said.

Prime Minister John Howard last week announced there was a potential terrorist threat, saying he had received intelligence indicating an attack on Australia was possible.

The threat was believed to involve people in Melbourne and Sydney, and an urgent amendment to existing anti-terrorism laws which gave police greater powers to arrest terrorist suspects was rushed through parliament as a result.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Damned if you do, damned if you don't.

Pretty sure there will be some that will complain about the way the Government/Police reacted because nothing happened.

Yet if something did happen, those same people would complain that the Police/Government didn't do anything to prevent it from happening.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont always believe the hype.

:ph34r:

Always watch the laws that get changed after an incident like this (top tip).

I think out of all the countries that I have looked into Austrailia seems to be about the only ones willing to do it right in the first place. Not only do you have this but consider what they do with those claiming "refugee status". Those people get to spend a bit of time in not so nice surroundings, last time I heard guarded by the army because they were acting a fool in their previous detention area, while their status is actually confirmed. I know for a fact that Canada for one could learn a lesson or two from the Aussie's reguarding how they handle new immigrants. Especially so-called refugees. But I'll stop now before I get on my soap box.

Stout Hearts

|RE|Warhawk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont always believe the hype.

:ph34r:

Always watch the laws that get changed after an incident like this (top tip).

I think out of all the countries that I have looked into Austrailia seems to be about the only ones willing to do it right in the first place. Not only do you have this but consider what they do with those claiming "refugee status". Those people get to spend a bit of time in not so nice surroundings, last time I heard guarded by the army because they were acting a fool in their previous detention area, while their status is actually confirmed. I know for a fact that Canada for one could learn a lesson or two from the Aussie's reguarding how they handle new immigrants. Especially so-called refugees. But I'll stop now before I get on my soap box.

Stout Hearts

|RE|Warhawk

Do you mean to say that Canada has a large immigrant problem? I know they have a large immigrant population (all the rich..erhm..Chinese people that emmigrated from Asia), but I've never heard that they have problems with them. Neither with refugees. As a matter of fact, Canada hasn't been terrorized lately. Not to the level of the USA, UK, Australia, or even my country. So perhaps, we could learn a few things from them as well.

On the other hand, absolutely beautiful job by the Australians. Granted that their anti-terror laws are a bit...draconian for democratic standards (but this should be covered in a whole different thread, if discussing democracy is allowed), but there you have it folks. You don't like the law of the land, you can leave.

The only problem from my point of view is that all the crazies leaving Australia because of this law will cross the sea and reside here. Which means more work for us....coupled with a corrupt and incompetent government...:rant:

Anyway, my point is, good on you Australia!

Out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Always watch the laws that get changed after an incident like this (top tip).

Laws were actually changed before the arrests, so that could actually be made. And frankly, if its all 'hype' why did one of these guys try to shoot the coppers? I dont care who they are, but i dont them in my country unless they are in a cage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am glad that the Police are dealing with this.

Once you make that decision to kill innocent civilians, you give up any right to civil liberty and all that goes with it.

This is not a political statment.

Dealing with terror is definatly :offtopic: and should be avoided on these forums.

Its both Political and Civil in its content and can cause major problems.

Colin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

an up to date article:

A day that forever changed our lives

Mark Dunn and Paul Anderson

09nov05

HOME-grown terror cells in Melbourne and Sydney accused of plotting a "catastrophic" chemical or explosive attack were smashed during early morning raids yesterday.

At least one of 16 men charged after the raids was prepared to martyr himself in a suicide attack, a Melbourne court was told.

A 17th suspect was shot and wounded in Sydney after opening fire at police on a day that forever changed Australia.

In the nation's biggest joint counter-terrorism operation, more than 400 federal and state police, along with ASIO agents, swooped on 22 properties in two states, arresting nine men in Melbourne and eight in Sydney, and seizing chemicals and computers.

"We were concerned the attack was imminent," Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Christine Nixon said.

Premier Steve Bracks said he believed police had disrupted "probably the most serious preparation for a terrorist attack that we have seen in Australia".

The suspects were charged with offences including conspiring to manufacture explosives in preparation for a terrorist act, and being members of a terrorist organisation.

No potential targets were revealed, but senior police said they assumed Melbourne and Sydney were high on any hit list.

On a day of high drama:

A MAN was shot in the neck by police in Sydney after firing on detectives. He was in a stable condition in hospital last night. A police officer was slightly wounded in the shootout, after which a bomb squad robot found a second handgun in the suspect's backpack.

A WILD brawl erupted outside Melbourne Magistrates' Court when supporters of the accused turned on photographers and cameramen.

MELBOURNE cell members had ordered "massive quantities" of chemical equipment, which could be used for explosives, police claimed.

CHEMICALS similar to those used in the London transport attacks, and firearms and backpacks, were seized in Sydney.

PROSECUTORS alleged Abdul Nacer Benbrika, also known as Abu Bakr, was the leader of the plot and oversaw the Melbourne and Sydney cells.

KINGLAKE was allegedly used as a paramilitary training ground with planning meetings to be held in Ocean Grove.

ISLAMIC leaders said they feared renewed hatred of Australian Muslims after the raids.

The 12 Victorian raids were carried out swiftly and without resistance in Coburg, Fawkner, Preston, Yarraville, Hoppers Crossing, Meadow Heights and Dallas.

The raids, part of Operation Pendennis, comprised more than 160 police and AFP officers in Melbourne, with Special Operations Group members, bomb technicians and the dog squad on standby.

The 16-month investigation was originally sparked by a tip-off from the Muslim community. Detectives used secret surveillance and phone taps before launching the raids.

Ms Nixon said an attack could have occurred at any time.

"We certainly are of the belief that there was the potential for great harm to be done to the community. We have thwarted that," she said.

"Much of the discussion of whether it (the target) was the (Sydney) Harbour Bridge or the (Melbourne) Stock Exchange . . . we don't have a location.

"But we did have sufficient evidence to believe that these people were planning a significant attack."

New anti-terrorism legislation was rushed through Federal Parliament last week to support the investigation.

"We came to a point where we believed we had sufficient evidence to be able to lay those charges. The amendment did assist us," Ms Nixon said.

Mr Bracks said there had been no threat to the Commonwealth Games.

"I can assure you it will be one of the safest Games ever," he said.

AFP Commissioner Mick Keelty said the operation would continue for months as evidence was collated.

He said the raids did not single out Muslims, but alleged terrorists.

"It will be clear that a lot of the activities centre in certain parts on certain cities, but it is the broader Islamic community who we need to keep on side, and who have assisted and will continue to assist," Mr Keelty said.

Victorian Islamic leader Yasser Soliman confirmed members of the Muslim community gave information to authorities as part of the investigation.

The nine Victorians were charged with being members of a terrorist organisation or directing the activities of a terrorist organisation, and could face further charges under state laws.

In Sydney, dozens of police reinforced security as the seven suspects were taken to court.

None of the accused appeared in the courtroom. They were remanded in custody until Friday.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am glad that the Police are dealing with this.

Once you make that decision to kill innocent civilians, you give up any right to civil liberty and all that goes with it.

This is not a political statment.

Dealing with terror is definatly :offtopic: and should be avoided on these forums.

Its both Political and Civil in its content and can cause major problems.

Colin

That's not because of the content. Rather of some who choose to discuss it and somewhere along the way leave their maturity, in some cases what little they have, at the door.

@xG5kdo

The problem with the immigration policy in Canada is not necessarily the immigrants themselves but the policy itself. I have witnessed first hand the lax way the immigration officers deal with "refugees" coming into Canada. In one specific case a "new immigrant" walked into the border crossing office after I had already been in there for 10 minutes. He walked up to the window and said (and this is no joke) "refugee" "Canada". Those were the only two words he said. He was taken to the back and walked out 5 minutes later with an Immigration officer saying "Those papers are all you need to work in Canada welcome to your new home" "Please report to this address on this date for your immigration hearing" and the immigrant walked out. Immigration Canada lately reported that they do not know the where abouts of some 80% of those who claimed refugee status to get into Canada. Of those nearly all failed to appear for their hearings. :nono:

Stout Hearts

|RE|Warhawk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...