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GDC III: Tribute to Soldier


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And thus ends undoubtedly a very heartfelt GDC ...

We all should be proud of what we have created here in the past seven days ... culminating in the Tribute to Soldier. All the more proud that we have such brave men and women among us so deserving of our praise ... who have sacrificed so much so that others may live.

And while this GDC was not about winning ... we have had some excellent, emotionally charged entries one of which is most worthy of the GDC III Award ...

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popular overload maybe, it is there  :thumbsup:

I'm actually VERY impressed with my host ... I only pay the guy for domain regsitration and he hosts me on some computer stashed away in a caraboo farm in Khazakstan - I'm guessing. But so far the little buggers held up! Hahaha.

I'm dying to check the webstats but I forgot the password :wall:

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Ok ... thanks for the heads up!

[Edit] Well, I sent a cry for help to Zjj to add a text link on the News page but she is gone :(  If there is a admin or staff person reading this that can change the News page entry, please add ...

You can also click here to view the Tribute.

You know, this is what I was trying to tell him before I left earlier, but did he listen to me? :no:

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You know, this is what I was trying to tell him before I left earlier, but did he listen to me?  :no:

Well it's your fault for leaving me hangin commando!! Sheesh, is this how you play GR too?? Zjj, need back up ... ho hum ... zjj!! need backup!!! ho hum ... rant2.gif

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I have been moved to tears. To all who worked so hard to do this I thank you.

My father and my fathers father thank you.

For my fallen comrades I thank you. I come from a long line of willing participants who have always met the call and served with pride and fortitude.

Some have paid the ultimate price. Others bear the marks either in body or in mind.

I showed this to my father who served in both WWII and Korea. He was amazed that those of us who have never had to experiance war up close and personal, were so in touch and in tune. With tears in his eyes he asked me to say how greatful he was that all that has been done has not been forgotten.

Thanks guys. You put some of the pride back in his eyes, thou coverd with tears.

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I'm only 28y old of age, never served in any arme, and I never will.

But being a citizen of Belgium, I know some stuff bout the 2big WW that were fought on this ground.

It deserves big respect for those who stood up for there loved ones and country, I can only imagine how though it must have been.

I greet u all and from the bottom of my heart i say thx to ever single man who defended his home and made ours free.

-M-

If u should ever go to belgium, there r quite some good exhibitions about the WW's , one very good is in 'Ieper' its called 'In flanders field' u can check it out at:

http://www.inflandersfield.be/

thx again, and I'm glad I could have been part of this.

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http://www.teamcdn.com/modules.php?name=Fo...c&p=31655#31655

Every year on November 11, nations around the world pause in a silent moment of remembrance for the men and women who have served, and continue to serve our countries during times of war, conflict and peace. We honour those who fought in the First World War (1914-1918), the Second World War (1939-1945), and the Korean War (1950-1953), as well as those who have served since then.

More than 1,500,000 Canadians have served our country in this way, and more than 100,000 have died. They gave their lives and their futures so that we may live in peace. Although the information below is that of Canadians who gave their lives, this day and it's significance transcends all borders.

Please view this VIDEO before proceeding on.

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In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

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Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae

"In Flanders Fields" was first published in England's "Punch" magazine in December, 1915. Within months, this poem came to symbolize the sacrifices of all who were fighting in the First World War. Today, the poem continues to be a part of Remembrance Day ceremonies in Canada and other countries.

The poem was written by a Canadian - John McCrae, a doctor and teacher, who served in both the South African War and the First World War.

Reply to Flanders Fields

Oh! sleep in peace where poppies grow;

The torch your falling hands let go

Was caught by us, again held high,

A beacon light in Flanders sky

That dims the stars to those below.

You are our dead, you held the foe,

And ere the poppies cease to blow,

We'll prove our faith in you who lie

In Flanders Fields.

Oh! rest in peace, we quickly go

To you who bravely died, and know

In other fields was heard the cry,

For freedom's cause, of you who lie,

So still asleep where poppies grow,

In Flanders Fields.

As in rumbling sound, to and fro,

The lightning flashes, sky aglow,

The mighty hosts appear, and high

Above the din of battle cry,

Scarce heard amidst the guns below,

Are fearless hearts who fight the foe,

And guard the place where poppies grow.

Oh! sleep in peace, all you who lie

In Flanders Fields.

And still the poppies gently blow,

Between the crosses, row on row.

The larks, still bravely soaring high,

Are singing now their lullaby

To you who sleep where poppies grow

In Flanders Fields.

- John Mitchell

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PLEASE WEAR A POPPY

"Please wear a poppy," the lady said

And held one forth, but I shook my head.

Then I stopped and watched as she offered them there,

And her face was old and lined with care;

But beneath the scars the years had made

There remained a smile that refused to fade.

A boy came whistling down the street,

Bouncing along on care-free feet.

His smile was full of joy and fun,

"Lady," said he, "may I have one?"

When she's pinned in on he turned to say,

"Why do we wear a poppy today?"

The lady smiled in her wistful way

And answered, "This is Remembrance Day,

And the poppy there is the symbol for

The gallant men who died in war.

And because they did, you and I are free -

That's why we wear a poppy, you see.

"I had a boy about your size,

With golden hair and big blue eyes.

He loved to play and jump and shout,

Free as a bird he would race about.

As the years went by he learned and grew

and became a man - as you will, too.

"He was fine and strong, with a boyish smile,

But he'd seemed with us such a little while

When war broke out and he went away.

I still remember his face that day

When he smiled at me and said, Goodbye,

I'll be back soon, Mom, so please don't cry.

"But the war went on and he had to stay,

And all I could do was wait and pray.

His letters told of the awful fight,

(I can see it still in my dreams at night),

With the tanks and guns and cruel barbed wire,

And the mines and bullets, the bombs and fire.

"Till at last, at last, the war was won-

And that's why we wear a poppy son."

The small boy turned as if to go,

Then said, "Thanks, lady, I'm glad to know.

That sure did sound like an awful fight,

But your son - did he come back all right?"

A tear rolled down each faded check;

She shook her head, but didn't speak.

I slunk away in a sort of shame,

And if you were me you'd have done the same;

For our thanks, in giving, if oft delayed,

Thought our freedom was bought - and thousands paid!

And so when we see a poppy worn,

Let us reflect on the burden borne,

By those who gave their very all

When asked to answer their country's call

That we at home in peace might live.

Then wear a poppy! Remember - and give!

by Don Crawford

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Canadians who gave their lives in the cause of peace while serving with United Nations Peacekeeping Missions

1. A/BGen H.H. ANGLE, RCAC, UNMOGIP, 17 JUL 1950

2. Spr R.H. VEZINA, RCE, UNEF I, 09 MAR 1957

3. Lt C.C. VAN STRAUBENZEE, RCAC, UNEF I, 10 MAY 1957

4. Cpl K.E. PENNELL, RC SIGS, UNEF I, 15 SEP 1957

5. Pte B.O. ADAMS, RCASC, UNEF I, 20 SEP 1957

6. Sgt I.L. STARK, RCE, UNEF I, 27 SEP 1957

7. Tpr R.E. McDAVID, RCAC, UNEF I, 29 NOV 1957

8. Pte I.A. SAWYER, RCASC, UNEF I, 22 APR 1958

9. Sig N.E. MASON, RC SIGS, UNEF I, 15 MAR 1958

10. LCol G.A. FLINT, PPCLI, UNTSO, 26 MAY 1958

11. Cpl J.T. ROBERTS, RCASC, UNEF I, 10 JUN 1958

12. Cpl G.S. PORTER, CProC, UNEF I, 23 APR 1959

13. Maj H. MOREWOOD, RCOC, UNEF I, 26 JUL 1959

14. Tpr R.H. ALLAN, RCAC, UNEF I, 28 NOV 1959

15. Pte A.T. HURST, RCASC, UNEF I, 04 FEB 1960

16. Cpl G.A. GAUTHIER, RCASC, UNEF I, 20 FEB 1960

17. Tpr R.J. WILEY, RCAC, UNEF I, 07 SEP 1961

18. Sgt R.H. MOORE, RC SIGS, ONUC, 06 OCT 1961

19. Cpl J.M. ALBERT, RCEME, UNEF I, 19 NOV 1961

20. Cfn D.S. ROSTER, RCEME, UNEF I, 19 NOV 1961

21. Cpl E. OLIVIER, RC SIGS, UNEF I, 09 DEC 1961

22. S/Sgt J.P. MARQUIS, RCOC, ONUC, 06 FEB 1962

23. Spr G.G. THOMPSON, RCE, UNEF I, 18 MAY 1962

24. Cpl E.G. GROOM, RCOC, UNEF I, 02 OCT 1963

25. W/C E.D. HARPER, RCAF, UNEF I, 02 NOV 1963

26. Sgt J.K. HERMANN, RCAF, UNEF I, 26 DEC 1963

27. Pte L.R. MORIN, CPC, UNEF I, 29 MAY 1964

28. Tpr J.H. CAMPBELL, RCAC, UNFICYP, 31 JUL 1964

29. Tpr A.A. BONS, RCAC, UNEF I, 27 NOV 1964

30. Cpl P.R. WALLACE, RCAC, UNEF I, 27 NOV 1964

31. Lt K.E. EDMONDS, CIntC, UNFICYP, 25 DEC 1964

32. Rfm P.J. HOARE, 1QOR of C, UNFICYP, 14 AUG 1965

33. Sgt J.S. BYRNE, RCASC, ICSC, 18 OCT 1965

34. Cpl V.J. PERKIN, RHC, ICSC, 18 OCT 1965

35. Gdsm J.J.P. CHARTIER, 2CDN GDS, UNFICYP, 14 MAR 1966

36. Pte D.A.J. LAMOTHE, RCASC, UNEF I, 16 MAR 1966

37. F/O R.V. EDWARDS, RCAF, UNEF I, 28 APR 1966

38. F/O J.M.L.P. PICARD, RCAF, UNEF I, 30 APR 1966

39. Pte J.P.E. BERNARD, 2RHC, UNFICYP, 09 JUL 1966

40. Spr R.F. LORIENZ, RCE, UNEF I, 12 JUL 1966

41. Sigmn P.M. CROUSE, RC SIGS, UNEF I, 19 AUG 1966

42. Tpr L.W. NASS, RCAC, UNFICYP, 27 SEP 1966

43. Pte E.J. FICKLING, RCASC, UNEF I, 17 OCT 1966

44. Cpl O.J. REDMOND, 1RCR, UNFICYP, 10 MAR 1967

45. Cpl K.A. SALMON, CProC, UNFICYP, 24 SEP 1967

46. Pte J.A. LERUE, 2RHC, UNFICYP, 09 FEB 1970

47. Pte T.J. HALL, 1RCR, UNFICYP, 31 JUL 1970

48. Cpl P.C. ISENOR, RCASC, UNFICYP, 25 OCT 1970

49. MCpl J.R.M.J. LESSARD, 2PPCLI, UNFICYP, 01 DEC 1972

50. Capt C.E. LAVIOLETTE, 12 RBC, ICCS, 07 APR 1973

51. Cpl A. ROACH, 2RCR, UNFICYP, 17 FEB 1974

52. Pte J.L.G. PERRON, CDN AB REGT, UNFICYP, 06 AUG 1974

53. Capt G.G. FOSTER, 116 ATU, UNEF II, 9 AUG 1974

54. Cpl M.H.T. KENNINGTON, CANADIAN CONTINGENT ADMIN UNIT, UNEF II, 09 AUG 1974

55. A/MWO C.B. KOREJWO, 1RCR, UNEF II, 09 AUG 1974

56. MWO G. LANDRY, 3R22eR, UNEF II, 09 AUG 1974

57. Capt K.B. MIRAU, 116 ATU, UNEF II, 09 AUG 1974

58. Cpl M.W. SIMPSON, 116 ATU, UNEF II, 09 AUG 1974

59. MCpl R.C. SPENCER, 116 ATU, UNEF II, 09 AUG 1974

60. Cpl B.K. STRINGER, 116 ATU, UNEF II, 09 AUG 1974

61. Capt R.B. WICKS, 116 ATU, UNEF II, 09 AUG 1974

62. Pte J.J.C. BERGER, CDN AB REGT, UNFICYP, 10 SEP 1974

63. Cpl J.P.C. BLAIS, 73 CANADIAN SIGNALS UNIT, UNEF II, 24 DEC 1974

64. Cpl N. EDWARDS, 73 CANADIAN SERVICE UNIT, UNEF II, 24 DEC 1974

65. Cpl R.W. MILLER, 73 CANADIAN SERVICE UNIT, UNEF II, 24 DEC 1974

66. Capt I.E. PATTEN, 1RCR, UNFICYP, 01 APR 1975

67. Pte S.J. KOHLMAN, 1RCR, UNFICYP, 11 APR 1975

68. Pte T.E. ABBOTT, 73 CANADIAN SIGNALS SQUADRON, UNEF II, 14 JUN 1975

69. Capt K.C. CRAWFORD, 3PPCLI, UNFICYP, 20 DEC 1975

70. Pte D.R. KRIEGER, 2PPCLI, UNFICYP, 17 AUG 1976

71. Sgt® J.R.A. DUPONT, 8 MEDICAL COY Att 12 RBC, UNFICYP, 24 APR 1977

72. Sgt L.W. DAILY, CANADIAN CONTINGENT CE SECTION, UNEF II, 10 NOV 1977

73. Sgt J.F.B. DEMERS, 73 CANADIAN SERVICE BATTALION, UNEF II, 05 DEC 1977

74. Cpl D.C. ROSS, CANADIAN LOGISTICS COMPANY, UNDOF, 03 MAR 1978

75. Pte C.A. DODGE, 73 CANADIAN SIGNALS SQUADRON, UNEF II, 02 JUL 1979

76. MCpl J.D.G. MCINNIS, 1PPCLI, UNFICYP, 30 MAR 1980

77. Pte P.K. PORTER, CANADIAN SIGNALS SQUADRON, UNDOF, 06 NOV 1980

78. Pte J.E.R ARCHAMBAULT, 2R22ER, UNFICYP, 30 NOV 1981

79. Pte A.J. PRINS, 2PPCLI, UNFICYP, 26 SEP 1982

80. Pte M.D. WILSON, 2PPCLI, UNFICYP, 22 JAN 1983

81. Cpl J.P.R. HUDON, CANADIAN LOGISTICS COMPANY, UNDOF, 26 DEC 1985

82. MCpl M. MACRAE, CDN AIRBORNE HQ & SIGS SQN, UNFICYP, 06 DEC 1986

83. Pte T.J. TROTTIER, 3PPCLI, UNFICYP, 25 APR 1988

84. Pte W.C. SYMONS, 2RCR, UNTAC, 12 JUL 1992

85. Sgt C.M. RALPH, 1CER, UNPROFOR, 17 AUG 1992

86. MCpl J.W. TERNAPOLSKI, 2RCR, UNPROFOR, 25 MAR 1993

87. Sgt D.L. KLOSS, 2RCHA, UNFICYP, 08 APR 1993

88. Cpl M.D. ABEL, CDN AB REGT, UNITAF, 03 MAY 1993

89. Cpl G.J. LAROSE, CANADIAN LOGISTICS COMPANY, UNDOF, 08 MAY 1993

90. Cpl D. GUNTHER, 2R22ER, UNPROFOR, 18 JUN 1993

91. Cpl J.M.H. BECHARD, 2PPCLI, UNPROFOR, 06 AUG 1993

92. Sgt J.D.A. GAREAU, CANADIAN CONTINGENT SUPPORT UNIT, UNPROFOR, 17 AUG 1993

93. Capt J.P. DECOSTE, 2PPCLI, UNPROFOR, 18 SEP 1993

94. MCpl S.L.P. LANGEVIN, 12RBC, UNPROFOR, 28 NOV 1993

95. Cpl® D. GALVIN, SHERBROOKE HUSSARS Att 12 RBC, UNPROFOR, 28 NOV 1993

96. Pte K.D. COOPER, 3PPCLI, UNPROFOR, 06 JUN 1994

97. MCpl M.R. ISFELD, 1CER, UNPROFOR, 21 JUN 1994

98. Cpl S.F. SMITH, CDN AB REGT, UNAMIR, 25 DEC 1994

99. Cpl J.F.Y. ROUSSEAU, 12RBC, UNPROFOR, 25 SEP 1995

100. Pte C. HOLOPINA, 2CER, IFOR, 04 JUL 1996

101. Pte J.L.M.B. DOUCET, 3 R22eR, UNMIH, 12 JUL 1997

102. Cpl R.D. VIALETTE, 1RCHA, SFOR, 21 JUL 1997

103. MCpl T.S. MCCREA, 1RCR, SFOR, 25 MAR 1998

104. Cpl J. OGILVIE, RCD, SFOR, 30 AUG 1998

105. Spr G. DESMARAIS, 2 CBT ENGR REGT, SFOR, 25 SEP 1998

106. Sgt H. Jerry Squires, 1 PPCLI, KFOR, 25 Aug 1999

107. Sgt V. Joubert, 1 R22eR, SFOR, 13 Dec 1999

108. Cpl Robert T. Pollard, 2 PPCLI, SFOR, 28 Sep 2000 Att 426 Squadron, Trenton

109. Bdr Gerald K. Bailey, 1 RCHA, SFOR, 27 Oct 2000

110. Bdr G.K. Bailey, 1 RCHA, SFOR, 27 Oct 2000

111. Sgt M. Léger, 3 PPCLI, Afghanistan, 17 Apr 2002

112. Cpl A. Dyer, 3 PPCLI, Afghanistan, 17 Apr 2002

113. Pte R. Green, 3 PPCLI, Afghanistan, 17 Apr 2002

114. Pte N. Smith, 3 PPCLI, Afghanistan, 17 Apr 2002

115. Cpl J.D. Vermeulen, 2 PPCLI, SFOR, 06 July 2003

116. Sgt R.A. Short, 3 RCR, ISAF, 02 Oct 2003

117. Cpl R.C. Beerenfenger, 3 RCR, ISAF, 02 Oct 2003

118. PO2 J.S. Morissette, SFOR, 13 December 2003

119. Cpl J. B. Murphy, 3 RCR, ISAF, 26 Jan 2004

120. Cpl A. D. Johnson, 1 RCR - att to RCD, SFOR, 29 Jan 2004

"They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old;

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them"

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"To a Fallen Peacekeeper" by Mr. Bob Kerr of Kanata, Ontario.

Mr. Kerr is a veteran of the Royal Canadian Navy.

To a Fallen Peacekeeper

Had I seen him fall...

I could have caught him

Eased his pain and

Bound his wounds-

He'd not have passed alone

So far from home.

Had I heard the shot

Had I seen the shooter

Had I seen him exposed

Had I been able to yell-

Had I ... had I ...

So far from home

My mind knows all the reasons

but my heart hears only the tears,

that he had to be there and fall

in somebody else's bloody business,

in the insanity of their freedom

So far from home.

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Who Is He

He is profane and irreverent, living as he does in a world full of capriciousness, frustration and disillusionment.

He is perhaps the best-educated of his kind in history, but will rarely accord respect on the basis of mere degrees or titles.

He speaks his own dialect, often incomprehensible to the layman.

He can be cold, cruel, even brutal and is frequently insensitive.

Killing is his profession and he strives very hard to become even more skilled at it.

His model is the grey, muddy,hard-eyed slayer who took the untakeable at Vimy Ridge, endured the unendurable in the Scheldt and held the unholdable at Kapyong.

He is a superlative practical diplomat; his efforts have brought peace to countless countries around the world.

He is capable of astonishing acts of kindness, warmth and generosity.

He will give you his last sip of water on a parched day and his last food to a hungry child; he will give his very life for the society he loves.

Danger and horror are his familiars and his sense of humour is accordingly sardonic.

What the unknowing take as callousness is his defence against the unimaginable; he whistles through a career filled with graveyards.

His ethos is one of self-sacrifice and duty.

He is sinfully proud of himself, of his unit and of his country and he is unique in that his commitment to his society is Total.

No other trade or profession dreams of demanding such of its members and none could successfully try.

He loves his family dearly, sees them all too rarely and as often as not loses them to the demands of his profession.

Loneliness is the price he accepts for the privilege of serving.

He accounts discomfort as routine and the search for personal gain as beneath him; he has neither understanding of nor patience for those motivated by self-interest, politics or money.

His loyalty can be absolute, but it must be purchased.

Paradoxically, the only coin accepted for that payment is also loyalty.

He devours life with big bites, knowing that each bite might be his last and his manners suffer thereby.

He would rather die regretting the things he did than the ones he dared not try.

He earns a good wage by most standards and, given the demands on him, is woefully underpaid.

He can be arrogant, thoughtless and conceited, but will spend himself, sacrifice everything for total strangers in places he cannot even pronounce.

He considers political correctness a podium for self-righteous fools, but will die fighting for the rights of anyone he respects or pities.

He is a philosopher and a drudge, an assassin and a philanthropist, a servant and a leader, a disputer and a mediator, a Nobel Laureate peacekeeper and the Queen's Hitman, a brawler and a healer, best friend and worst enemy. He is a rock, a goat, a fool, a sage, a drunk, a provider, a cynic and a romantic dreamer. Above it all, he is a hero for our time.

You, pale stranger, sleep well at night only because he exists for you, the citizen who has never met him, has perhaps never thought of him and may even despise him.

He is both your child and your guardian. His devotion to you is unwavering.

He is a Canadian Soldier.

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Neighbours by chance;

Friends by choice;

God bless them both.

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Edited by *CDN* AnGus
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I have a cousin serving in Iraq and an uncle who was part of the Ranger team in Somalia. Out of respect, I don't like to ask them anything at all about their experiences.

I myself have led a fairly isolated life without once having to worry about losing it. I would never presume to know what service men and women go through ... I just know that it is they that put their own lives on the line to make sure I don't ever have to worry about losing my own.

I can't think of anything else that deserves more honor.

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I can't think of anything else that deserves more honor.

Ronin,

This may have all started out as a competition...

However, what I walk away with in the end is a deep sense of satisfaction in knowing that I contributed to a truly worthy Tribute.

I hope that all those who end up viewing our Tribute To Soldier understand that this was not about politics or "picking sides". It was an honest expression of remembrance, honoring all those who have served and still serve their countries.

silent_op

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I just wanted to say THANKYOU to all who contributed to the tribute...

Long time reader of the .net but an ol-fogie who doesn't usually post...well I registered just so I could offer a warm appreciation for what's been done here...

Every year about this time me and my Army buddy Bear remember some friends that were lost in Panama and Mogadishu (I was in 82d, he was in 10th MTN)... this site and the friendly bunch that run it have always been soldier appreciative whatever their politics or nationality...

Thanks again,

-Morgan (SAPPER A/307)

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:notworthy: Excellent tribute by all who participated. A special prayer for all who have given their lives for a better world. 0:) A personal tribute to my father who was based in England during WWII and who flew over 30 missions in a B27J. :thumbsup:
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