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Spray painting weapons


McNamee
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Check at your local hardware or super-store for a flat non-reflective paint. Krylon makes a pretty good one. Take care to only paint non-moving part and to not paint closed any seams or holes. Lay down a base coat (usually brown or tan for woodland) and then accent with your other colors one at a time. You can use the edges of leaves etc for natural looking lines/patterns.

Edited by ReconSnake
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Also found this web site, talks about camoing weapons guille suits and the like and the concepts your aiming for.

This too

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Found this too

Well I'm doing what GorkoSan suggested. First I took all of the internals out my APS. I put on 2 layers of green textured rust-oleum, then I mist sprayed brown on it, heavier in sections to give it a camo pattern look. I have to say that so far it looks good. That is all I did to it so far, but I think I might do more to it. I'm also going to make a gun wrap for it.

This too a GURU guide I think.

Heres a a extract:

Start by masking off any parts that might be sensitive to the paint, especially scope lenses and sights.  If your gun has colored markings for the safety or selector, it might be a good idea to mask that area off too.   try not to introduce paint into the action of the gun, so either mask off the ejection port area or remove the bolt and put some paper towels in the action to keep the spray out.    Prepping the AR 15 is easy: you close the dust cover.   Clean the remaining areas with alcohol on a paper towel to make sure the gun is dry and clean of oil or leftover solvents.    I found that the paint goes on best when the gun is warm and the paint can is relatively cool.  Drying the paint too fast can sometimes give you glossy spots, so keep it out of the sun until the sheen from the wet paint has gone away, once that happens, you can put it out in the sun to speed up curing.   In really hot or humid environments the paint will have problem sticking, and then all of a sudden glob up and start running.   If you encounter this, back off, and use light coats while you let it dry between coats.    The base color is the most important, but it is not necessary to completely cover the gun with it.   Remember if you get a bad spot, you will have a chance to cover it up with one of the other colors.   Give sufficient time between colors for the paint to dry.   It does not have to completely dry, but at least let it dry enough for the sheen to go away.    The more time you take on this, the better off you will probably be. 

Once the gun has been painted and the paint has dried, you are ready for the burlap.  It is macho to use your survival knife for cutting and trimming the burlap, but scissors are more practical.   First, put test strips of burlap over the gun to and check function.   You will find that there are parts you dare not put the burlap on or near because it will cause problems.   Most of the time, you can burlap the gun from muzzle to breech, but not much behind that.  It usually does not hurt to go with a few layers or strips in different colors, but if your burlap is all one color, it is easy to spray it in a pattern just as you had sprayed the weapons.  

Start applying burlap right behind muzzle an work your way back.   You can temporarily hold the burlap on parts with the duct tape until you get the pattern sorted out.  It is a matter of trial, error and tweaking on the burlap pattern as you match and trim pieces to go on the gun.   Once you have what you think will be the final pattern,  go around the gun removing the tape and attaching the zip ties wherever you can without sacrificing comfort or interfering with any function of the gun.   You have to make it so that the burlap does not flap around or come loose enough to snag on anything.   Clip the excess tails off the zip ties and paint them.   Note that the zip ties can have some sharp edges when you clip them and you will need to do a little more trimming to make them comfortable.  In some cases, you can use a lighter to melt some of the sharp edges down, but it can also light the burlap on fire so be careful.  

Once you have the camo applied to the gun, re-check function and handling to make sure that nothing in the camo interferes with using the gun.  The burlap treatment not only makes the weapon harder to see, but muffles the noises made when the gun is knocked around, thus making for a much more stealthy package.  If everything goes right, you now have a tactical advantage that few people ever put much energy into.

Sounds cool cant go wrong.

And this also from another site:

The shiny surfaces of a gun should be neutralized before heading to the woods. Several methods are available for doing this.  Elastic Camouflage Sleeves or socks are quick, inexpensive and effective, but may impair your ability to sight down the barrel correctly.  Camouflage Tape is good, but rust will develop under the tape if it gets rained on.  To help prevent rust, spray your gun with a rust preventer before you apply the tape.  Strip the tape off if the gun gets wet, wipe it down to remove the water and re-spray it with rust preventer.  Then re-apply the tape.  Be aware that rust can develop within a few hours of the gun getting wet. 

Another method of camo is to Parkerize, or Brown the barrel and receiver of the gun.  Usually you would want a competent gunsmith to do this.  The result is a dull, matte, non-reflective finish.  Another method is to Permanently Paint the surfaces in a camouflage pattern with camo-colored flat paints.   Start by painting the entire surface with a base color--usually black or brown.   Then follow up with several additional colors (green, rust, dull yellow, brown) in various patterns.  You can create these patterns by cutting out several different shapes from a piece of heavy cardboard.  Then hold these pattern boards on the surface of your weapon while applying the paint.  Paint will eventually wear off, so touch up the bare spots as needed.  Some hunters are appalled at the idea of ruining the finish of a good gun by painting it.  Most serious turkey hunters, however, are toting around permanently painted weapons.  If you do not want to apply paint or tape to an expensive weapon, buy a good used one and use it only for turkey hunting.

The most expensive method is to purchase a new or used gun that the manufacturer has painted in a camo pattern or one with a dull, matte finish.  Most brands and dealers offer specialty camouflaged turkey guns with short barrels and screw-in choke tubes that are great gobbler getters. 

If you decide not to camouflage your shiny gun, be assured that turkeys will see the out-of-place weapon despite your efforts to keep it concealed.  Camo that gun!

Heres some snipers talking about there camoed weapons too, or should I say hunters.

From reading all this stuff my summary is, Shine and Outline. And that not only your gear needs to be cammoed, anything shinny or with an outline needs to be covered with camo material. And that you need to camo your face there was a guide on that as well on the first link, said shadow areas should be lightened and light areas darkened. Also said you need to break up your head outline. So your bonnie hat Mac need some guille material maybe? Also as for the outline of the weapons seems to me you have to just do what looks right. Shame its not covered in snow, for that they said just lay white cloth over your rifle and white clothes, or if snow on the ground and trees not covered as well Green top clothes with white trousers. But what happens when you lie down??? lol.

Edited by Chems
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The best way to paint a rifle is not with spray paint. I'm sure those specops guys you see with their rifles spray painted, did that in 10 minutes at tops. If you want a nice camo texture rifle, use a good ole' paint brush. I'm currently painting my air rifle for ######s and giggles, and i'm painting it in desert camo. The kind used in Desert Storm. Sand color base, with brown camo patches, and black dots here and there. I will take pictures of my rifle in stages so you can see how it is done.

Remember though, the best tip i can give you is to be patient. Let your paint dry, and cure. Put your base color on, let it dry for 2 or 3 days. Then go in, do your detail work, and let it sit for 2-3 days. Check it over, if everything looks decent, let it sit for another couple days before you use it. That way, you wont have any paint peel off due to pre-mature handling.

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A last second post...

I do something called the "Guinnea Ghili." Yes, I'm Italian, what gave you that idea?

What you do is grab a small bush and rip it from the ground whatever way you can. Then get some fishnet stocking and tape it to your back, legs, etc. Even better if you already have the stockings twined into your clothing. Then strip down the bush and stick the pieces in lines going diagnol across your chest, back, legs, etc. Then grab another bush, and do the same. Repeat until your entire body is covered.

We've built ghili suits in under 15 minutes with this method.

--Harrm

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A last second post...

I do something called the "Guinnea Ghili." Yes, I'm Italian, what gave you that idea?

What you do is grab a small bush and rip it from the ground whatever way you can. Then get some fishnet stocking and tape it to your back, legs, etc. Even better if you already have the stockings twined into your clothing. Then strip down the bush and stick the pieces in lines going diagnol across your chest, back, legs, etc. Then grab another bush, and do the same. Repeat until your entire body is covered.

We've built ghili suits in under 15 minutes with this method.

--Harrm

You live in Italy, or you're just Italian and live somewhere else?

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