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Martial Arts Training


Dark Ranger
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Well, in the old forums, we used to have a Martial Arts Thread. So I'm going to start it up again. :) Post your current form of study, any interesting tournament happenings, awards, or even training routines. I'll go first:

I've studied Shotokan Karate 4 years, and attained 1st Dan.

I also was involved in 3 1/2 years of:

Kali/Silat/Escrima

Jun Fan/Jeet Kun Do (the method and philosophy of Lee Jun Fan (Bruce Lee)

Muay Thai Boxing

Maphilindo Silat

Western Stritchia Rapier - Level of Scholar attained

What about you all... :ph34r:

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I've "studied" Krav Maga to the extent that I know it's history and foundations. I like the sound of it. Doesn't it feature in that new Jennifer Lopez movie "Enough"? Anyone know when that's coming out in the UK?

I'm gonna follow Rocky's advice and get in contact with Sensei Ronnie Watt about Shotokan Karate lessons up here.

... Right after my exams :(

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I've studied Taekwondo and Hapkido for about 6 years. I've heard mixed reviews of Krav Maga. Good gun dis-arms, the rest looks mostly like knees and elbows. Never heard of Shao-Lin Do what is that style like?

Shao Lin do? Are you sure?

Do is Japanese for Way. Bushi-do (the Way of the warrior). Karate-do (The way of the bare hand).

Shao Lin is Chinese. They are an order of monks who create their own very potent and very deadly martial arts (based on fighting techniques brought to them by a buddhist monk from India) to defend their temple from bandits and the occasional manchurian army raids.

There are several Shaolin temples and well, for lack of a better term, Dojo in Jakarta, Indonesia. I know of several in NYC too. But I've never heard them referred to as Shao Lin Do.

Out.

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I've "studied" Krav Maga

isnt that what the israeli army developed as their hand to hand fighting technique? think i remember reading some things about that before..

Krav Maga (Contact Combat) is the official system of defensive tactics, hand-to-hand combat and self-defense employed by the Israeli defense and security forces, the Israeli national and military police, and its special operations and anti-terrorist units.

Krav Maga was extended beyond the army, and it has been offered, after adaptation to civilian frameworks.The system is now taught to classes of children, young adults, men, and women, in private institutes and under the auspices of the Israeli Ministry of Education.

It is taught internationally by the instructors of the International Krav Maga Federation.

Check out this link for more info...Krav Maga Inc.

Edited by Dark Ranger
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Never heard of Shao-Lin Do what is that style like?

Shao-Lin Do home website is here:

Shao-Lin Do

I studied under sifu Bob Green who's sifu was Grandmaster Sin Kwang The'

The system is based on Shao-Lin Kung Fu but adopted the karate belt system to provide Americans a level of accomplishment. The style's true level of accomplishment is based on one's own skill. I obtained the rank of 1st Dan.

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Thanks for the responses everyone...

I'm familiar with it, and I was going to attend a law enforcement instructor course...But before I shell out the $550.00 (plus another $1,000.00 or so for travel expenses and accomodations), I wanted some feedback from those that have studied it...

Just wanted to see if it's as effective as it looks... :D

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Hm...I first started with body building (yes, I know it's not a martial art)..I got really big and wanted to add some skill and coordination to the raw force..Kendo was my first martial art, I realy got into it..then I moved to Aikido..unfortunately, couldn't continue, due to imposible day routine I have lately..now days I just go to gym 3-4 times a week. A new Dojo is announced to be open in a whille, and hopefully it will have more acceptable working/training hours to my schedule, so I plan to continue with Aikido.

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What about fighting on the street when all that kung fu crap goes down the toilet.

I had my fightings on the street between quite large numbers and i found that martial arts practicers got hit pretty bad and the ones that learend the street way as i did were less harmed.

The 6 months of Judo i had mean only that now i know how to fall wich isn`t bad but the other things i learned are usless.

I remember once about 6 years ago i was in a fight against 3 others i hit evrething that moved with my fists and got out with a few bruses and one teeth shaiking :wacko:

But two had black eyes ;)

Now days no one makes fun of me or hits me intentionaly it might be my 1.89m and 96kg maybe maybe :D

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What about fighting on the street when all that kung fu crap goes down the toilet.

That's a good point.

It totally depends what the Martial Artist has trained in. Guys who have trained for many years will improve their chances, of course they will. For example - if I had played squash for 10 years, and you had played none, and we had a game - who would win?

But the degree of success is totally down to the individual and the style. Traditional Shotokan guys like me don't train to be street fighters, so I wouldn't expect to fair well against a street fighter. We train to be good Martial Artists, which is the full package, Kumite and Kata.

On the other hand there are Martial Arts the Kyonkoshinki Karate where you have guys that train to pound your ###### into the ground - and they are good at it, but again - not the best at street fighting.

Then you get the grapplers, ju-jitsu etc. ever seen the Gracie's fight? Something like 90% of all scraps end up on the floor, so if you come up against a grappler, you better hit him hard so when he goes down, it's with his eyes shut. (Which is where Karate-ka excel - hitting hard)

To go back to your question though..

What about fighting on the street when all that kung fu crap goes down the toilet.

That's something that people who have not trained to fight like to throw out there, because they feel threatened by the fact that some guys train to fight and are obviously better prepared should the situation occur where they have to get down to business. The fact is - it's only kung fu crap if it's crap kung fu. Work that one out. :ph34r:

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Then you get the grapplers, ju-jitsu etc. ever seen the Gracie's fight? Something like 90% of all scraps end up on the floor, so if you come up against a grappler, you better hit him hard so when he goes down, it's with his eyes shut.
i have seen gracie fight... grapplers i believe are the most dangerous fighters. like rocky said, "most fights end up on the ground" and once you are there it is over. but even when standing grapplers are still very tough to deal with. :o
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Swift kick to the knee-cap and the fights over, even for a grappler. Plus you grapple me I'll just bite your nose off.

Gotta get ruthless with some of these guys.

Back in the day, we had a little saying "by whatever means necessary".

Edited by NightCrawler
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I've been studying a little bit of everything for about 22 years now, mainly the chinese styles and a hard focus on win chun. Had a chance to really look into the traditional TKD and hapkido while stationed in ROK. Got started in kali about 6 years ago, but could never successfully blend the footwork with my previous training. My opinion, the best sticking style ever, but I just couldnt get the feet. Now my stick work is a wierd mix of escrima and kali. Knives are kali, budo and win chun. I've been teaching a mixed freestyle (nothing official) for about 8-9 yrs.

On a side note, I really never liked the gracies. I always felt a pure grappler was too limited. Until recently (last 4-5 years) the gracie style had almost no standing work worth anything, but thanks to a guy named Sakuraba, that all kinda changed in a hurry. I totally agree that grappling is a very serious art to contend with, but I'm a firm believer in training for all aspects. It all depends on your focus. Mine was to learn and combine all the pieces of every style I could find into something that worked best for me. Others take the more traditional approach. Some martial artists are fighters, and some fighters are martial artists.

As far as martial arts, I really think all are equal and deserve respect as art forms.. (except maybe the americanized McDonalds style tkd schools all over the place that teach cookie cutter garbage, and muay thai, which was always meant to be a sport, not an art. MT is one of the best pure fighting styles, and facing one would scare the crap outta me, but in my opinion, traditionally not a martial art)

As far as fighting, if you follow pride or k-1, you'll see that it really never depends on style. It's all about the individual fighter. Hell, look at tank abbot from the old UFC days, compare him with gracie. Pure fighter, pure martial artist. (ok, royce would have totally killed tank 99% of the time, but you get my point)

Just my opinion

Fehyd

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