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Well then, one of two things has happened.

One, The hardware test and site are wrong.

Two, Your mobo BIOS automatically over clocked your PC100 to PC133 or it isnt PC 100 RAM at all.

Your RAM all has to run at the same speed. There is no getting around that.

So something has to give here.

95% of all PC's, left to default settings with no intervention, slow down to the speed of the slowest RAM since Overclocking on 95% of machines is not an automatic option.

So something else is happening here that we dont have the facts about.

Hmm...

Well, let's apply Ockham's razor. The simplest answer must be correct. In this case, the simplest answer would be that the RAM marked as PC100 is actually PC133. Logic would dictate that four different hardware monitors, including the BIOS, wouldn't give false readings, nor would the PC 'automatically' overclock, according to Phantm, whose judgment I trust.

Therefore, the simplest answer is that the RAM was mis-marked. If any of the other possibilities were true, it seems to me that, after several hours of hard, constant use, I'd be seeing some signs that something isn't right. But I've seen the contrary - the machine runs beautifully.

Still, I'm open to any ideas/suggestions that you guys may have. I don't know the answer - that's why I asked. :D

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95% of all PC's, left to default settings with no intervention, slow down to the speed of the slowest RAM since Overclocking on 95% of machines is not an automatic option.

So something else is happening here that we dont have the facts about.

Agreed, I have never heard of a mobo clocking up slower ram.

@Para, try another cpu program calle WCPUID it is another analyzer of cpu speed.

Done. Same results. ~1526.3 MHz - fluctuates 0.1 MHz now and again. I therefore must assume that that's the actual speed, and that the FSB is actually ~132 MHz. Heh.

EDIT - I forgot to ask: Is there a way to find out how fast a stick of RAM really is, without having to take anything out of the case? I don't want to have to take things out unless I absolutely have to.

Edited by Parabellum
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Kind of, did u go into the memory info on CPU-Z? Otherwise not without removing the known good pc133 stick.

BTW, if the ram had been oc'd to 133 which I dont believe is possible but anyways under constant use it would still be okay.

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Kind of, did u go into the memory info on CPU-Z? Otherwise not without removing the known good pc133 stick.

BTW, if the ram had been oc'd to 133 which I dont believe is possible but anyways under constant use it would still be okay.

CPU-Z didn't report any RAM information, other than the total amount. That's what's got me buggered. Well, I guess I'll monitor things for a few days, just to make sure that green ooze doesn't spill out from anywhere.

:D

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The other thing we have to remember here also, is that no matter what speed RAM he puts in there, the RAM itself is NOT going to change the FSB settings. The RAM is also not capable of changing the clock multipliers for the proc or the FSB. That can only be done on the mobo through Jumpers, or through soft settings in the BIOS.

When RAM is labeled PC100 or PC133, that is just the max frequency that the RAM can run at. The RAM itself cannot change the FSB frequency.

So given that, I have another question.

These hardware sights you use that monitor and read this information: Do they actually read it, or just report what the BIOS has them set at? I know alot of them only report what the BIOS has them set at, by getting the info from the BIOS.

It is entirely possible that the RAM is mislabeled. But I know for a fact that PC100 and PC133 will run flawlessly on the same bus together.

Either way, it is working well for him, and I suspect that we cant get a concrete answer without being there to look at the PC in person to check it out.

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The other thing we have to remember here also, is that no matter what speed RAM he puts in there, the RAM itself is NOT going to change the FSB settings. The RAM is also not capable of changing the clock multipliers for the proc or the FSB. That can only be done on the mobo through Jumpers, or through soft settings in the BIOS.

When RAM is labeled PC100 or PC133, that is just the max frequency that the RAM can run at. The RAM itself cannot change the FSB frequency.

So given that, I have another question.

These hardware sights you use that monitor and read this information: Do they actually read it, or just report what the BIOS has them set at? I know alot of them only report what the BIOS has them set at, by getting the info from the BIOS.

It is entirely possible that the RAM is mislabeled. But I know for a fact that PC100 and PC133 will run flawlessly on the same bus together.

Either way, it is working well for him, and I suspect that we cant get a concrete answer without being there to look at the PC in person to check it out.

WCPUID actually shows a real-time readout of the CPU speed. I don't know about the rest of them. At any rate, like you said, things seem to be working fine, so I'll just leave it alone for now. Thanks for the information and advice.

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These hardware sights you use that monitor and read this information: Do they actually read it, or just report what the BIOS has them set at? I know alot of them only report what the BIOS has them set at, by getting the info from the BIOS.
I know CPU-Z reads it. Para, that should have memory settings on another tab.

When RAM is labeled PC100 or PC133, that is just the max frequency that the RAM can run at. The RAM itself cannot change the FSB frequency.
So my PC3500 Kingston Hyper X that runs at 450MHz when the max it is rated for/at is 434MHz happens to be magic :P The factory just makes sure it can run that high then label it that as long as it is UBER stable.

It is entirely possible that the RAM is mislabeled. But I know for a fact that PC100 and PC133 will run flawlessly on the same bus together.
I think it had to have been mislabled.

Either way, it is working well for him, and I suspect that we cant get a concrete answer without being there to look at the PC in person to check it out.
Agreed, mail it to me so I can test it :P j/k Edited by Stinger
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These hardware sights you use that monitor and read this information: Do they actually read it, or just report what the BIOS has them set at? I know alot of them only report what the BIOS has them set at, by getting the info from the BIOS.
I know CPU-Z reads it. Para, that should have memory settings on another tab.

When RAM is labeled PC100 or PC133, that is just the max frequency that the RAM can run at. The RAM itself cannot change the FSB frequency.
So my PC3500 Kingston Hyper X that runs at 450MHz when the max it is rated for/at is 434MHz happens to be magic :P The factory just makes sure it can run that high then label it that as long as it is UBER stable.

It is entirely possible that the RAM is mislabeled. But I know for a fact that PC100 and PC133 will run flawlessly on the same bus together.
I think it had to have been mislabled.

Either way, it is working well for him, and I suspect that we cant get a concrete answer without being there to look at the PC in person to check it out.
Agreed, mail it to me so I can test it :P j/k

I know there's another memory tab, and that tab didn't tell me anything, except how much RAM I have. All other fields were greyed out.

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Then your motherboard is too old to be recognized by cpu-z to take active readings on the RAS,CAS,RES and speed.

My MOBO isn't an old model at all. The particular revision is just a few months old. At any rate, I've found out from SOTOPhantm what I needed to know.

Edited by Parabellum
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